This month’s Recipe Redux theme couldn’t come at a better time. With temperatures dropping to the teens and snow still on the ground, a nice, hot batch of savory homemade soup is perfect to ward off the bitter chill. The challenge is to use a ‘new’ food trend in a soup or one-dish meal, so after looking at a few lists online, I decided to include a couple ingredients from the 2013 food trends from Bon Appetit and Fox News.

Spice is Nice
Soup is good food, but soup with some red hot chili peppers will warm you up a lot quicker! Adding gochujang, a Korean red chili paste to soups not only turns up the heat but adds a rich and savory flavor thanks to fermented soybeans. Use this paste sparingly in place of tabasco or Sriracha, and you’ll find the flavors of your dishes have taken on a whole new level.

Vegged Out
Kale is one of my favorite veggies for its neutral taste, high nutrition and low calories. From smoothies to soups, add kale to your dishes for extra helpings of fiber, vitamins and minerals (see the quick-reference nutrient chart at The World’s Healthiest Foods.) Serve water-sauteed kale with your bacon and eggs, add a handful to your favorite protein smoothie, or massage it with some salt and serve it as a raw side dish. Any way you serve it up, you’ll benefit from this nutritious powerhouse.

Soup’s On!
I have to admit, this soup changed directions as I was making it, and it was mostly influenced by my recent cravings for Vietnamese pho (rice noodle soup.) Fresh parsley and lime help balance the savory saltiness from the gochujang and a little bit of fish sauce. (My husband says it reminds him of Tom Yum Goong, a spicy Thai soup.)

This soup will take less than 30 minutes from prep time to meal time. If you can’t find the Japanese radish daikon, you can use thinly-sliced jicama, which is fairly neutral-tasting. If you don’t have Napa cabbage use all kale.

Spicy Rice Noodle Soup_1

Vietnamese-Style Rice Noodle Soup with Fish, serves 2
If you like pho or tom yum goong, you’ll enjoy making this quick soup at home.

Ingredients:
2 teaspoons sesame oil
1 teaspoon Chinese 5 Spice
¼ teaspoon cinnamon (I used Saigon cinnamon—potent stuff!)
1″ ginger, peeled and sliced
6 ounces white fish cut into chunks
32 oz. chicken broth
2 servings (4 oz.) dry rice noodles (feel free to use either thin rice vermicelli or thicker pad thai noodles)
1 cup sliced daikon
1 ½ cups chopped kale
1 cup chopped Napa cabbage
1/3 – 1/2 bunch fresh parsley, stems and all
2 teaspoons Gochujang (NOTE: use 1 teaspoon if you’re not into spice, more if you are!)
1 tablespoon fish sauce (such as Three Crabs)

Garnish:

Fresh parsley leaves
Fresh tofu, cut into ½” cubes
Lime wedges

Directions:

Over medium heat in a large stock pot, stir sesame oil, 5 spice and ginger, heat for 1 minute. Add  fish, stirring to help cook evenly, about 4-5 minutes. Add half of chicken broth, increase heat and bring to a boil. Add remaining broth and dry rice noodles. Add daikon, kale, Napa cabbage and parsley. Cover and simmer for 10 minutes. Stir in gochujang and fish sauce, heat for 1 more minute.

Divide soup between two large bowls. Top with thinly sliced onion, parsley, tofu and lime wedge. Serve immediately.

Some of these “new” food trends may already be familiar in your kitchen, but it’s also a good way to learn more about foods you may not have tried before, or even heard of.

Speaking of which, check out what other Reduxers have made with their own food trend choices.

Do you have a favorite trendy (or just popular) food at a restaurant? Have you ever tried making it at home? How’d it turn out?



 

Happy What I Ate Wednesday! I hope you all are enjoying your Independence Day, especially you, Jenn, at Peas and Crayons! Thanks again for hosting another fun-filled episode of WIAW. Our theme this month is Fun, Food and Fitness, and I have a nice way to start it off, as well as a delicious dinner recipe to go with this week’s Flavor of the Week, orange!

Last week I was having fun with new food experiments (like raw chocolate chip cookies) but by the time Friday came along I was ready to take a break from the kitchen and take in some new scenery. After a quick breakfast of coffee and orange date cake we headed up to Ithaca and visited Buttermilk Falls State Park. I was looking forward to this trip for a while and even though there wasn’t much water coming down the falls, it was still beautiful:

Beautiful day at Buttermilk Falls State Park.

The trail takes you right by the creek so you can cool off your hot tootsies!

The trails were nice and shady, but going up numerous stairs in the beginning proved to be a good workout (especially with a bunch of noisy teenagers behind you!) After enjoying the numerous waterfalls, pools, and overall scenic splendor of the park, we headed back to town and popped in to The Mate Factor Cafe & Juice Bar in Ithaca. Unfortunately, they had THE worst espresso in the world. It smelled okay and looked okay, but it tasted like they put half a lemon in it.

THE lousiest espresso in the world.

My tofu-avocado wrap wasn’t bad, though they did go heavy on the Kalamata olives, which made it kinda salty:

Tofu avocado wrap, no onions.

Couldn’t finish it, folded it up like a  little purse and took it home.

We got home early so spent a couple hours doing yard work until around 8:30pm (these long days are awesome!) Dinner was leftover lunch for me and  leftover dinner (below) for my husband:

Saturday night special: spelt crust pizza with pepperoni, mushrooms and fresh basil

In keeping with this week’s Flavor of the Week theme, I wanted to share this recipe for Fish with Orange-Shoyu* ** Sauce I made for dinner  on Monday. I came across a Teriyaki Orange Fish Filet recipe that sounded pretty good, so I just modified a few things, including the name (I hope it’s okay that I did this.)  The fish is simmered in a light sauce of orange and ginger, perfect for the walleye we were lucky enough to get from my sister (her husband’s a great fisherman!) It’s a quick and easy meal, and of course, healthy!

*shoyu = soy sauce. Won’t sound as good if I called it ‘Orange Soy Sauce Sauce’!

**After moving to NY from HI, there are certain words I have to start using in conversation, like ‘soy sauce’ instead of shoyu, ‘flip flops’ instead of slippers, and ‘creek’ (or ‘crick’) instead of gulch. My husband also referred to the continental US as ‘the mainland’ at work the other day, and people were like, “What are you talking about?”

This light, delicate orange sauce is infused with fresh ginger.

Fish with Orange-Shoyu Sauce (modified from Teriyaki Orange Fish Filets at grouprecipes.com)
serves 4

Ingredients:

1 lb fish filets, such as walleye, but use any fish you like
1 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon sesame oil
1 1/2 cups fresh squeezed orange juice
2 tablespoons shoyu (soy sauce)
1″ piece ginger, sliced thinly or grated
1/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes (optional)
1 1/2 teaspoons agave syrup or 2 teaspoons sugar
3/4 cup thinly sliced yellow onion
4 stalks green onion, chopped (reserve 1 tablespoon for garnish)
zest of 1 orange
4 cups broccoli florets
2 cups sugar snap peas or snow peas

Directions:

Season fish with salt, set aside.

Mix orange juice through agave syrup. Stir in sliced onions and green onion. Add half of orange zest.

In a large frying pan, heat sesame oil over medium heat. Add fish, cook for 1 minute. Spoon half of the orange mixture over fish, letting it simmer before adding more sauce to pan. Cook fish for 2 minutes, turn over and pour remaining orange mixture over fish, adding half of orange zest. Simmer high and cook for a minute then add broccoli and peas. Turn heat down to medium-low, cover and simmer for 3 minutes.

Serve with brown rice and garnish with remaining orange zest and green onion. Enjoy!

These large walleye filets are enough for 4 people…looks like we’ll be having leftovers. :)

Have the rice cooked ahead of time for a quick and easy weeknight dinner.

Low-fat and packed with protein and vitamins, this dish is perfect for a post-workout meal.

What are some of your favorite hiking spots? What’s your favorite post-hike meal? Don’t forget to leave a comment below, I’d love to hear from you!

Happy Wednesday, everybody! It’s my third attempt at WIAW sponsered by Jenn at Peas and Crayons, and I’ve enjoyed reading all the other bloggers’ pages to get new ideas and inspiration for future meals.

This past week of eats has included more meats than usual. Chicken tikka, barbecued chicken and some grilled bison steak were served up and enjoyed immensely! I still include some raw veggies for breakfast and lunch, as well as with the meaty meals, so haven’t gone too overboard with the change in diet.

Breakfast was a bowl of VeggieNook’s Oatmeal Raisin Cookie Green Smoothie served outdoors (I’ve been eating this pretty much every day, it is that delicious, and my husband likes it, too! ) Next week, I promise I will post a different breakfast picture:

For contrast, I have to include a picture of my husband’s breakfast:

Fresh eggs from my sister’s hens, jalapeno cheese hot dogs and half a strawberry. :)

Lunch was leftover tuna fish-stuffed sweet peppers and salad. I started eating the salad before I remembered to take a photo, but here’s a pic of the stuffed peppers:

Dinner was done Hawaii-style with Furikake Panko-Crusted Ahi (I think Justa’s panko-crusted fish got me hungry for this crunchy dish!) I served it with Mae Ploy sweet chili sauce because the fish itself only had flavor on the coating, but you can also make a good dipping sauce with 1 tablespoon mayonnaise mixed with 1 teaspoon soy sauce. There was extra panko mixture so I cooked up some chicken, too:

Anything panko-crusted is hard to resist!

And dessert was a slice of gluten-free Sweet Potato Haupia Pie, freshly posted yesterday!

For the Furikake Panko-Crusted Ahi, you can use any fish that is suitable for pan frying. I didn’t know which brand of panko to get around these parts, so my sister recommended Sushi Chef Panko found at Weis Markets (it comes in a black cardboard box, about the size of a cornstarch box.) It stayed nice and crispy and tasted very much like the panko I used to buy in Hawaii.

Furikake Panko-Crusted Ahi, serves 2
Be sure to steam some rice before cooking the fish.

2 ahi fillets (about 6-8 ounces total)
2 tablespoons furikake
1/2 cup panko (Japanese style bread crumbs)
1 egg
1 tablespoon ice water
2 tablespoons flour
salt
oil for frying

Instructions:

Line a large plate with paper towels, set aside.

Place ahi fillets or pieces on a plate in single layer and rub with a pinch of salt on both sides. Set aside. Mix furikake and panko in a pie pan or dish. In another pie pan or small bowl beat egg and water. Pour oil into a large frying pan until 1/4″ depth and heat on medium high.

Meanwhile, dust fish with flour, coating all sides. Next, dip fish pieces into egg wash, one at a time, making sure all sides are coated. Transfer to panko mixture, turning to coat evenly.

To test if oil is hot enough, drop a small dusting of flour into oil,  it should start to bubble and sizzle. Add fish pieces one at a time, being careful not to overcrowd the pan. Cook fish pieces for 2-3 minutes on one side (or less if fish pieces are thin,) turning heat down to medium. Fry for another 1-2 minutes on the other side.  Transfer cooked fish to paper towel-lined plate to drain excess oil. Serve immediately with sweet chili sauce or mayonnaise-soy sauce mix (1 tablespoon mayo to 1 teaspoon soy sauce.)

Eat well!